Traceability

Traceability

Traceability, the ability to  track seafood products from point of catch to point of sale, helps prevent seafood fraud, illegal fish, and human rights violations. Learn more about record keeping and systems to track the flow of seafood products and transparent supply chains. 

Resources

No hidden catch - Mainstreaming values of small-scale fisheries in national accounts

It is notoriously difficult to obtain data for fisheries, especially for the more elusive small-scale sector, which tends to operate under the radar. These guidelines aim to assist national statistics officers and others improve the way they account for small-scale fisheries (SSF).

Five core functions of traceability technology

Through years of engagement with seafood businesses and technology companies, Future of Fish has developed five core business functions of traceability technology. All five must be in place in order to address seafood’s social and environmental ills effectively. Not only must robust end-to-end traceability track products on a batch-level basis, but it also must provide a level of corporate transparency at each step in the chain. Here are the five core functions:

Seafood Traceability Glossary: a guide to terms, technologies, and topics

This document provides definitions for common vocabulary associated with traceability, traceability technology products and systems, and seafood supply chains. Illustrations, diagrams, and photographs of select terms have also been included to provide additional clarification.

The untapped potential of story to sell seafood

As part of its overall effort to bring greater transparency and traceability to seafood supply chains, Future of Fish set out to explore the power of story to sell more fish and to determine what elements of that story most influence consumer purchasing behavior. This study is part of a series of investigations to identify the business benefits of data-rich supply chains and ignite market incentives for more responsibly harvested and traded seafood.

Making sense of wild seafood supply chains

A primer for resource managers, scientists, fishers, and other industry players seeking to harness the power of supply chains to ignite sustainable management in artisanal fisheries.

Introducing Storied Fish

"Storied Fish" is seafood that comes with verifiable information about its journey from water to plate. We explain what it is, why it's important, and how it can add value for chefs and restaurants.

New and emerging technologies for sustainable fisheries: A comprehensive landscape analysis

This document provides a landscape analysis of the technological ‘state of play’ as well as current activity relating to the use of new and emerging technologies to help solve common fishery-related challenges at the global, regional and national levels, including the individuals, organizations, countries and technology service providers engaged in these activities. Activities range from on-the-water technical implementations of cameras or other sensors to collect data, to regional scale efforts to monitor illegal fishing using satellites, to global scale efforts to streamline and modernize data management systems.

The ten principles for global transparency

Transparency in the fishing industry is the best weapon we have have against the twin tragedies of illegal fishing and human rights abuse in the sector. EJF has collated ten simple principles for states to follow.

FAO Podcast TZH 46 - How do you tackle illegal fishing?

Illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing is worth an estimated US$23 billion annually, but it’s wreaking havoc on marine resources and the environment. The Port State Measures Agreement (PSMA), introduced in 2016, aims to tackle this global problem. It's the first binding international agreement that specifically targets illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing. To date, 87 States are party to the treaty, with more to follow. To explain how the treaty works, we hear from Manuel Barange, director of Fisheries and Aquaculture, and Matthew Camilleri, senior fisheries officer at FAO.

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