Africa

Discussions

Every day millions of people harvest fish – by boat, by foot, with nets, with cages, in inland waters and on the ocean. Some of it is for direct consumption locally, but most of their harvests provide the rest of the world with a wide variety of fish and aquatic plants that contribute to nutritious and healthy diets. The majority of these women and men - including youth - operate in the highly diverse small-scale artisanal sub-sector. Small-scale artisanal fishers, fish farmers and fish workers hold enormous potential to promote transformative changes in production, processing, distribution and consumption of fish and aquatic products. These artisanal fishers also contribute to healthy and diverse diets, livelihoods, community prosperity and traditional culture.

In order to recognize the efforts of these millions of small-scale fishers worldwide, in the framework of IYAFA 2022, FAO in Oman hosts an exceptional event highlighting the role that small-scale fishers, fish farmers and fish workers play in food security and nutrition, poverty eradication and sustainable natural resource use.

 

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In celebration of International Women’s Day 2022 this event will highlight the role of women in small-scale fisheries in Africa and feature actions to break the gender bias in small-scale fisheries. This event is timely, at the start of the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries and Aquaculture 2022 and will set the scene for a series of events on gender and women’s empowerment throughout fisheries and aquaculture value chains.

Acknowledging the role women play in fisheries, and the deep-rooted challenges they face is essential to constructing gender-based approaches to management, allowing and incentivizing women to engage in responsibilities all along the value chains. Through the progressive implementation and use of relevant international instruments, guidance and the implementation of Gender Transformative Approaches, policies should aim to secure women’s access to, use of, voice in and tenure over resources, markets and leadership roles.

 

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Join experts Heike Baumüller, John Walakira and Etienne Hinrichsen as they present and discuss a recent paper that was published around aquaculture production performamce in Africa.

African aquaculture production has gradually increased over the years, but progress is still slow. Given large variations between African countries with regard to the availability of water, the macro-economic context, access to capture fisheries resources and other factors, the performance of African countries in aquaculture cannot be considered only by absolute production levels or contribution to GDP. Additional indicators must be considered that also take into account the role of aquaculture as a source of food supply as well as other macro economic variables, such as population size and natural resource endowment.

 

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Leading By Examples: Leaderships in Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries

The congress theme for the 4WSFC AFRICA, ‘Leading by Examples: Leaderships for Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries,’ recognizes the many examples, lessons and experiences that individual, communities, governments, inter-governmental organizations, and other supporting institutions have in the efforts to build and enhance capacity for sustainable small-scale fisheries. The focus on “leaderships” is a tribute to the immense progress that has been made in the past decade by all sectors, in elevating the profile of small-scale fisheries and in advancing understanding about them. It is also meant to inspire more actions and collaboration to continue to promote and support small-scale fisheries.

The 4WSFC AFRICA is co-hosted by the Institute of Poverty, Land and Agrarian Studies (PLAAS), University of Western Cape, South Africa, in partnership with TBTI Global and with support from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations. We welcome organizations interested in supporting sustainable small-scale fisheries to join as partners to this initiative and help contribute to the development of the congress program and to support the participation of delegates.

 

Abstracts for individual papers or organized sessions (about 250 words) are accepted until April 15, 2022.

 

Hello everyone! We invite you to watch this short documentary on Madame Kokoly, a traditional Vezo fisherwoman living in the Velondriake region of southwest Madagascar. This video is hosted in the SSF Hub Resource Library and is available in several languages, which can be selected underneath the “Information about Resource” tab on the right side of the screen.

Please feel free to share your reactions to the video in the discussion section (here), pose a question to other members of the SSF Hub, or respond to one of the following discussion questions:

  1. Was there anything you saw in the film that you can relate to?
  2. Kokoly learned many of her skills from her father when she was young. What sort of knowledge or skills related to fishing are passed down from generation to generation in your community?
  3. Many members of Kokoly’s community depend on her to provide them with food from her catch. How do fishers in your community support the lives and nutritional needs of their family, friends, and neighbors?
  4. In order to supplement her income, Kokoly began farming seaweed. Do local fishworkers in your community engage in alternative livelihoods to supplement their income? If so, what do they do?
  5. How do women contribute to food security in your communities? Are their contributions similar or different from the contributions of men?
  6. How do you think Kokoly’s community will change as there are fewer and fewer fish in the sea? What would a better future look like for her community?
  7. What do you think of Kokoly’s quote: “Everything, once it's worth something, you won't see it anymore.” How does it relate to your life or the lives of your community members?

AFRAQ2021 technical program will aim to cover developmental issues including latest research on aquaculture in Africa. The thematic plenary and technical parallel sessions will comprise submitted oral and poster presentations. AFRAQ2021 will feature an international trade exhibition, industry forums, student sessions and activities, satellite workshops (and training sessions) and various meetings/forums on aquaculture development in Egypt and Africa. The theme for this inaugural event will be “Sustainable Aquaculture - Feeding Africa”.

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Resources

Translating SSF Guidelines Into Practice With the Small-Scale Fisheries Academy

In this short research report, we present action research with self-selected men and women in small-scale fisheries in Senegal, a country with a large and dynamic SSF, which suffers, however, from diminishing profitability as a result of multiple pressures. We report ongoing work on the principles and approaches of the Small-Scale Fisheries Academy as a way to support the implementation of these Guidelines. The first phase of developing the SSF Academy focuses on testing learning methods aimed at developing critical thinking, planning and action.

Climate Change and Marine Fisheries in Africa: Assessing Vulnerability and Strengthening Adaptation Capacity

This report takes stock of available knowledge on the economic importance of marine fisheries in sub-Saharan Africa and the populations that depend on them and provides a biophysical analysis of the impacts of climate change as they have already been measured and how they are modeled to evolve, a socioeconomic analysis of the same impacts of climate change, and preliminary estimates of the vulnerability of marine fisheries.

Post-harvest practices for empowering women in small-scale fisheries in Africa

Post-harvest challenges faced by small-scale fisheries stakeholders have been the focus of numerous projects, programmes and investments in Africa. Many of these initiatives have aimed to benefit women, who often dominate processing and trade activities.

This report provides a summary of key findings from a desk review and primary data research that has aimed to identify successful post-harvest initiatives related to infrastructure design and management, improved post-harvest technology, value addition and access to finance.

Extension manual on production of quality catfish seed

This manual has been put together to assist extension workers and other trainers in facilitating and delivering improved technologies to catfish breeders to produce fast-growing and healthy fingerlings for profitable ventures.

Rapid Assessment Toolkit for Sharks and Rays

WWF and the Centre for Sustainable Tropical Fisheries & Aquaculture (CSTFA) at James Cook University have developed the first Rapid Assessment Toolkit focused on sharks and rays. The Toolkit consists of practical and simple step-by-step guidelines for collecting basic information using six complimentary tools.

Energising local economies: experiences of solar start-ups in Kenya's small-scale fishing and agriculture sectors

How are enterprises and NGOs in rural Kenya addressing poor people’s needs for energy that helps them earn a living? This paper looks at what new solar start-ups are doing to promote productive energy use in the fishing, agriculture and service sectors. It asks what specific productive energy needs the projects are targeting — such as cold storage for fish caught in Lake Victoria — and how they address the various barriers that prevent communities from fulfilling those needs. The six case studies include microgrids, irrigation pumps and multi-service energy hubs.

Subsistence fish farming in Africa: A technical manual

The objective of this manual is to explain how to build facilities that produce animal protein - fish - using minimal natural resources and minimal external supplies. These fish are being produced for the purpose of subsistence.

Making sense of wild seafood supply chains

A primer for resource managers, scientists, fishers, and other industry players seeking to harness the power of supply chains to ignite sustainable management in artisanal fisheries.

COVID-19 impacts and adaptations in Asia and Africa's aquatic food value chains

We tracked the impacts of COVID-19 on aquatic food value chains in Bangladesh, Egypt, India, Myanmar and Nigeria during 2020. We assessed the availability and price of aquatic foods and production inputs using a high frequency panel survey of 767 actors from eight value chain nodes. We also conducted semi-structured phone interviews with 63 respondents in Bangladesh and online interviews with 100 aquatic food value chain actors and key informants from 17 sub-Saharan African countries. This information provides insights into the pathways by which the crisis has affected aquatic food value chain actors, the scale of those impacts and how they have adapted. These findings give rise to policy recommendations aimed at mitigating impacts in the present, assisting recovery and building a more resilient aquatic food system in the future.

Kokoly

Against a backdrop of extreme poverty, personal loss and a marine environment changing beyond her control, Kokoly lives on a knife edge. Filmed over four months, Kokoly follows a traditional Vezo fisherwoman Madame Kokoly - as she reflects on her live experiences and carries out her daily routine in and around the coastal waters of southwest Madagascar.

Post-harvest losses in small-scale fisheries: Case studies in five sub-Saharan African countries

This regional programme began in October 2006 and lasted 18 months. It aimed to build on past initiatives and develop tools for practical loss assessment in artisanal fisheries. The programme provided capacity building for fishery officers in qualitative and quantitative fish loss assessments methods, planned support, and supervised the implementation of loss assessment studies in five sub-Saharan African countries (Ghana, Kenya, Mali, United Republic of Tanzania and Uganda).

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